10 Key Things to Know About Social Media and Jury Consulting

jury consulting social media facebook twitter blog

As the jury pool progressively ages and more and more jurors hail from the Facebook generation, it has become utterly crucial for litigators to consider social media in the processes of jury selection, jury consulting and persuasion. The statistics of Facebook’s prevalence alone are astonishing.

  • Facebook has more than one billion members worldwide
  • The average person spends about 12 hours/month on it
  • The average person has 229 friends, but for the 18-34 set, the average is 318
  • The average person creates three pieces of new content every day
  • Fifty percent of all users log in every day
  • Fifteen percent of all users update their own status every day
  • One billion pieces of content are shared every day
  • About one-third of the U.S. population is on Facebook
  • Ninety-eight percent of 18-24 year olds use social media
  • The fastest growing demographic of Facebook users is age 35 and older

As we view social media, we must remember that research has shown that – perhaps surprisingly — most people present their real self, rather than their idealized self, on social media profiles. In court, in contrast, jurors may intentionally put their best or worst foot forward, depending on their agenda.  Thus, social media offers a wealth of data about prospective jurors not evident in court.

by Laurie R. Kuslansky, Ph.D.

Read more here:

http://www.a2lc.com/blog/bid/63880/10-key-things-to-know-about-social-media-and-jury-consulting?source=Blog_Email_%5B10%20Key%20Things%20to%20Kno%5D

Want to Become a Better Communicator? Become a Better Leader

 

The lack of leadership abilities, an inability to engender respect and overall poor performance was killing his profits. Unfortunately, while his way of describing his leaders was a novel one (i.e., morbid curiosity), the existence of poor leadership is anything but a novelty.

The most commonly occurring of these competencies are:

  • Envision an Outcome – The ability to clearly envision a strategic outcome, think conceptually and see the big-picture.
  • Understand Others – Often called “Emotional Intelligence” this is the ability to accurately understand those being lead.
  • Inspire Others – Brining understanding of the strategic vision and emotional intelligence together to effectively communicate that vision and achieve buy in.
  • Understand Themselves – One of the most overlooked traits, this is the ability to objectively understand one’s own strengths and weaknesses.

Complete Your Leadership Talents Profile Here

By guest author Jay Niblick, Founder/CEO – Innermetrix Inc.

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Want to Become a More Powerful and Confident Communicator? Fake it til You Become it

In an amazing presentation, Havard professor Amy Cuddy, gives inspirational advice in dealing with fears and communicating in an effective way through a simple, quick process.

Body language affects how others see us, but can it also change how we see ourselves?  Social psychologist Amy Cuddy shares an easy way that anyone can change not only others’ perceptions of them, but the way they feel about themselves .

In her 20 minute TED talks, Cuddy points out that, “Tiny tweaks can lead to big changes.”

 

 

The Simple Influences of Social Psychology on Complex Things

How is it that people can be convinced to say “yes” to something even if they may not be interested in the idea on its merits? In other words, why are we such suckers? Why do we end up saying “yes” to salespeople selling us products we don’t want all the time?

In the video below, Cialdini explains why we are so susceptible.

http://bigthink.com/robertcialdini (click the social psychology link)

The Neuropsychology of Persuasion: 6 Shortcuts to Winning Someone Over

Persuasion

In our increasingly overloaded lives today we need shortcuts, or rules of thumb, to guide our decision-making. So says Big Think expert Robert Cialdini, professor of marketing and psychology at Arizona State University

Cialdini’s research is based on six fundamental principles of human influence: reciprocity, scarcity, authority, consistency, liking and consensus. Cialdini says that if these principles are employed in an ethical manner, they can significantly increase the chances that someone will be persuaded by your request.

These shortcuts are explained in the video animation here:

Learn How the iPad is Becoming More and More Practical for Litigation

Remarks is a new PDF app designed for the iPad from the fine folks at Readdle who know a thing or two about annotation and PDFs on the mobile screen. It is a fully featured PDF annotating application, with a variety of tools to fine-tune your marks. You can highlight, underline, strikeout text, draw upon the documents – that means pretty much anything you can do with the document on paper.

You can get Remarks for $4.99 in the app store – a small price to pay if it becomes your favorite note-taking, PDF annotating, document collaboration app on the go.

reblogged from the Advocates Studio here:

http://advocatesstudio.com/2012/02/03/remarks-an-ios-pdf-mark-up-app-with-something-different/

Spot Your Jury Leader

At ATS (Art of Trial Sciences) we typically address ways in which you can become a better communicator, but today, with the insight from a fellow colleague, we’re going to take a look at the receivers of your communication strategy.

Dr. Ken Broda-Bahm takes a look at a critical aspect of your presentation: your audience’s leader.

Who leads and who follows? That question can be critical to understanding and adapting to your jury. The individual who sets the agenda, guides the discussion, and leads uncommitted or wavering jurors to a conclusion is obviously worth a closer look than those who take their cues from others. A failure to know and to thoroughly learn about that future leader can have big consequences for your case. Samsung learned that recently when following Apple’s historic $1 billion patent verdict against the company, Judge Koh denied Samsung’s motion for a mistrial based on the supposed improper influence exerted by the jury’s foreperson….

By Dr. Ken Broda-Bahm

Blog: http://www.persuasivelitigator.com/2012/12/spot-your-jury-leader.html?goback=.gde_1810088_member_199771460

Looking to Engage an Audience? Tell a Story…using Levers

Daniel Goleman shares some insight on storytelling using different levers depending on your audience.  For those of in the communications and litigation worlds, the use of the redescription lever is the most notable and something that we should implement everyday, whether we are talking with our clients, jurors, judges or bosses.  While implementing this lever, be wary of what Goleman calls resistances, as I have clients spend countless hours developing presentations, only to fall flat on delivery, because they didn’t wholly consider their audience’s needs.

Enjoy!

Levers of storytelling

One of the ways in which innovative stories seem crucial is when a business is changing direction. Or when you need to mobilize people when things go wrong. Or when you need to reinvigorate a team due to low morale. Which begs the question: What are the kinds of levers that a leader can use to create an effective storytelling strategy to move people in the right direction?

First, it depends on who you are dealing with…

More here:

http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20121206172801-117825785-strategic-storytelling?trk=eml-mktg-condig-118-p1
By:

Daniel Goleman

Co-Director of Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence in Organizations

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Mimicking Can Make You a Better Communicator

We like people more when they mimic us. But only up to a point. If mimicry becomes too obvious, it can backfire, becoming mockery. A new study asks just how much imitation is enough to trigger benefits. Does the mimicker need to copy every action, or merely to move the same body parts?

Peggy Sparenberg and her colleagues conducted three experiments in all. In the first two, 126 participants performed movements while at the same time watching videos of human-like avatars performing various movements of their own here:

http://bps-research-digest.blogspot.com/2012/12/for-mimicry-to-flatter-its-all-about.html

 

dog-mimicking-sign-shopped-or-not

The Secret to Communicating More Effectively….

“In the right key one can say anything.  In the wrong key, nothing: the only delicate part is the establishment of the key.”

—George Bernard Shaw

By Tony Robbins

One of the best ways to become aware of the astonishing diversity of human reactions is to speak to a group of people. You can’t help noticing how differently people react to the same thing. You tell a motivational story, and one person will be transfixed, another bored to tears. You tell a joke, and one person howls while another doesn’t move a muscle.  You’d think each person was listening in a different mental language.

The question is, why do people react so differently to identical messages? Why does one person see the glass as half-empty and another see it as half-full?  Why does one person hear a message and feel energized, excited and motivated while another heads the exact same message and doesn’t respond at all?

More here: http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20121204003551-101706366-the-secret-to-communicating-more-effectively-metaprogram-1