10 Things Every Mock Jury Ever Has Said

by Laurie R. Kuslansky, Ph.D.
Jury Consultant

For decades and in every part of the nation, mock jurors who are presented with various fact patterns and legal issues tend to have the same reactions. Some are helpful and others are harmful, depending on where you stand in the case.  Knowing that these issues recur over and over can help to prevent those which are unfavorable to you:

 

1)     Why did the plaintiff wait so long to sue?

While there may be good reason to delay filing suit, mock and actual jurors often use the delay between the alleged problem and the filing of a claim as a yardstick of its merit.  The longer the gap, the less credible the claim.  If counsel fails to address this issue, it tends to work against the plaintiff. It is especially damaging, for example, when someone claims an issue in the workplace, but waits until they are no longer employed. To many jurors, this signals  that it was the termination, separation, or voluntary departure that was the issue, not the conduct, such as discrimination, that is the subject of the complaint.

 

2)    That doesn’t make sense.

Lawyers don’t always put their case through the basic “smell test” or test of common sense from the…

Read more here:

http://www.a2lc.com/blog/bid/65267/10-Things-Every-Mock-Jury-Ever-Has-Said?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+a2lc+%28The+Litigation+Consulting+Report+from+A2L+Consulting%29

mock trial mock jurors what they all say

10 Key Steps After: “I’ve Got a Case I Might Need Help With”

“I’ve got a case I might need some help with.” That’s how it usually starts when someone, usually a first or second chair litigator, reaches out to me at A2L Consulting.

What happens next is not something that I have discussed publicly a great deal. But there’s no reason not to. It actually represents a well-honed process that we have developed over the last 18 years that helps trial teams try cases more effectively. Our process is unique and special.

I want to share an overview of that process, because when you understand it, you can appreciate how we, as jury & trial consultants and as trial graphics experts, help many of the top trial lawyers in the nation prepare for trial.

by Ken Lopez
Founder & CEO
A2L Consulting

Find out what’s next here:

http://www.a2lc.com/blog/bid/64406/10-key-steps-after-ive-got-a-case-i-might-need-help-with?source=Blog_Email_%5B10%20Key%20Steps%20After%3A%20%5D

10 Key Things to Know About Social Media and Jury Consulting

jury consulting social media facebook twitter blog

As the jury pool progressively ages and more and more jurors hail from the Facebook generation, it has become utterly crucial for litigators to consider social media in the processes of jury selection, jury consulting and persuasion. The statistics of Facebook’s prevalence alone are astonishing.

  • Facebook has more than one billion members worldwide
  • The average person spends about 12 hours/month on it
  • The average person has 229 friends, but for the 18-34 set, the average is 318
  • The average person creates three pieces of new content every day
  • Fifty percent of all users log in every day
  • Fifteen percent of all users update their own status every day
  • One billion pieces of content are shared every day
  • About one-third of the U.S. population is on Facebook
  • Ninety-eight percent of 18-24 year olds use social media
  • The fastest growing demographic of Facebook users is age 35 and older

As we view social media, we must remember that research has shown that – perhaps surprisingly — most people present their real self, rather than their idealized self, on social media profiles. In court, in contrast, jurors may intentionally put their best or worst foot forward, depending on their agenda.  Thus, social media offers a wealth of data about prospective jurors not evident in court.

by Laurie R. Kuslansky, Ph.D.

Read more here:

http://www.a2lc.com/blog/bid/63880/10-key-things-to-know-about-social-media-and-jury-consulting?source=Blog_Email_%5B10%20Key%20Things%20to%20Kno%5D

Want to Become a Better Communicator? Become a Better Leader

 

The lack of leadership abilities, an inability to engender respect and overall poor performance was killing his profits. Unfortunately, while his way of describing his leaders was a novel one (i.e., morbid curiosity), the existence of poor leadership is anything but a novelty.

The most commonly occurring of these competencies are:

  • Envision an Outcome – The ability to clearly envision a strategic outcome, think conceptually and see the big-picture.
  • Understand Others – Often called “Emotional Intelligence” this is the ability to accurately understand those being lead.
  • Inspire Others – Brining understanding of the strategic vision and emotional intelligence together to effectively communicate that vision and achieve buy in.
  • Understand Themselves – One of the most overlooked traits, this is the ability to objectively understand one’s own strengths and weaknesses.

Complete Your Leadership Talents Profile Here

By guest author Jay Niblick, Founder/CEO – Innermetrix Inc.

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Want to Become a More Powerful and Confident Communicator? Fake it til You Become it

In an amazing presentation, Havard professor Amy Cuddy, gives inspirational advice in dealing with fears and communicating in an effective way through a simple, quick process.

Body language affects how others see us, but can it also change how we see ourselves?  Social psychologist Amy Cuddy shares an easy way that anyone can change not only others’ perceptions of them, but the way they feel about themselves .

In her 20 minute TED talks, Cuddy points out that, “Tiny tweaks can lead to big changes.”

 

 

The Simple Influences of Social Psychology on Complex Things

How is it that people can be convinced to say “yes” to something even if they may not be interested in the idea on its merits? In other words, why are we such suckers? Why do we end up saying “yes” to salespeople selling us products we don’t want all the time?

In the video below, Cialdini explains why we are so susceptible.

http://bigthink.com/robertcialdini (click the social psychology link)