Five Tips to Keep Trial Tech on Course: Rules to follow when you’re in charge of courtroom presentation.

My favorite quote from this article is “If you want to see the worst of someone’s personality, go to trial with them — especially those who are only in trial once a year or less.

A little OCD can go a long way. Making sure everything is in order before you go to sleep at night will help you rest. Waiting to finish something in the morning can lead to other problems if something goes slowly, or additional work comes in. One point should be very clear — this is not a 9 to 5 job.”

By Ted Brooks

The option of using the tools of technology for trial presentation is no longer an issue for debate. Once thought of as running the risk of appearing “too slick,” juries and judges now expect to have the ability to view the evidence — even in bench trials.

With this acceptance comes an increased level of expectation. Where it was once not uncommon for an attorney to spend a few minutes digging through a stack of exhibits or boxes to locate a desired exhibit (and sometimes not finding it), it is now only a matter of seconds from the time an exhibit is mentioned until it is on the screen for all to view.

This bridge between attorney and evidence is often referred to as the “Hot Seat.” Like the attorney who could not find the important exhibit, the Hot Seat operator shares in the burden and risk of disturbing the flow of the trial. Although it looks like a well-rehearsed performance when done properly, technology glitches can cause a delay — or even a mistrial.

Here are a few things to include in your “insurance policy” that can help prevent a courtroom meltdown.

 

When is Your War Room: What to Do 14 Days Before Trial

By this point, you should have reservations for your hotel rooms, your office space, and your equipment. With the exception of your travel arrangements (see below), you should very much be in the “crossing your t’s and dotting your i’s” stage of planning. In other words, it’s time to:

by:

Read more here:

http://www.thetrialwarroomhandbook.com/?p=375

 

The 12 Worst PowerPoint Mistakes Litigators Make

by Ken Lopez
Founder & CEO
A2L Consulting

Some online estimates say that about 30 million PowerPoint presentations are given every day. That number seems more than a bit high, and it’s hard to find a credible source for it.

In the legal community, we give our fair share. Since legal services are about 1% of the total economy, we can make a guess that at least 60,000 PowerPoints are being given every day in the U.S. legal industry, or about 6,000 for every hour of the working day.

PowerPoint has been the dominant presentation software in the courtroom since 2003. When used well in the courtroom, it allows a skilled presenter to captivate an audience with a well told story, enhance the audience’s understanding of a case, and persuade skeptics that the presenter’s position is correct. In other words, a well-crafted PowerPoint presentation helps tip the scales of victory, potentially substantially, in your client’s favor.

Unfortunately, I believe the typical PowerPoint presentation used in the courtroom causes more harm than good. Here are twelve easy-to-avoid PowerPoint mistakes.

 

Read the full article here:

http://www.a2lc.com/blog/bid/63708/the-12-worst-powerpoint-mistakes-litigators-make?source=Blog_Email_%5BThe%2012%20Worst%20PowerPo%5D

New iPad App Declutters Voir dire

A new app for the iPad is proving to be a contender in the litigation technology world.  Jury Pad from Bench and Bar helps attorneys and consultants alike leave their legal pads, sticky notes and even pens and papers at home and organizes all the relevant information one would need during voir dire.  With the ability to pre-load information from your Pc or Mac ahead of time, this app can be used on the fly or prior to court.

The app also allows you to export all your information to a spreadsheet or text file to share with the rest of your trial team.  A true innovation in trial technology!

Find more information here:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/jurypad/id580845085?mt=8

iPad Screenshot 1

12 Ways to Avoid a Trial Technology Superbowl-style Courtroom Blackout

How could this happen and what caused it?

Well, inconceivable trial technology failures are precisely the kind of thing you need to plan for in the courtroom. At some point in everyone’s career, something is bound to go wrong during trial, and you need to minimize the chance of something going wrong with your trial technology.

Here are 12 possible problems that could lead you to fumble the ball during your trial presentations, and here are ways of preventing them.

http://www.a2lc.com/blog/bid/62782/12-Ways-to-Avoid-a-Trial-Technology-Superbowl-style-Courtroom-Blackout?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+a2lc+%28The+Litigation+Consulting+Report+from+A2L+Consulting%29

by Ken Lopez
Founder & CEO
A2L Consulting

trial technology consultants avoid failure

The Neuropsychology of Persuasion: 6 Shortcuts to Winning Someone Over

Persuasion

In our increasingly overloaded lives today we need shortcuts, or rules of thumb, to guide our decision-making. So says Big Think expert Robert Cialdini, professor of marketing and psychology at Arizona State University

Cialdini’s research is based on six fundamental principles of human influence: reciprocity, scarcity, authority, consistency, liking and consensus. Cialdini says that if these principles are employed in an ethical manner, they can significantly increase the chances that someone will be persuaded by your request.

These shortcuts are explained in the video animation here:

Learn How the iPad is Becoming More and More Practical for Litigation

Remarks is a new PDF app designed for the iPad from the fine folks at Readdle who know a thing or two about annotation and PDFs on the mobile screen. It is a fully featured PDF annotating application, with a variety of tools to fine-tune your marks. You can highlight, underline, strikeout text, draw upon the documents – that means pretty much anything you can do with the document on paper.

You can get Remarks for $4.99 in the app store – a small price to pay if it becomes your favorite note-taking, PDF annotating, document collaboration app on the go.

reblogged from the Advocates Studio here:

http://advocatesstudio.com/2012/02/03/remarks-an-ios-pdf-mark-up-app-with-something-different/