Want to Become a Better Speaker in and out of the courtroom? Read this…

Presenting in court is the ultimate test in public speaking: your on stage in front of dozens to hundreds of people, with a few dozen listening intently & scrutinizing every word out of your mouth, with millions of dollars at stake.

Vivek Wadhwa breaks down some critical steps in delivering your presentation.  i’m particularly found of this one:
“If you use a PowerPoint, just put the highlights on it and don’t read from the slides. Have the PowerPoint supplement and substantiate what you are saying and give the audience—and you—a roadmap of what your talk is about. Graphics are better than words.”

Your visual strategy should be prepared as diligently as your oratory presentation.

This came with practice and perseverance. Let me share some of the lessons I’ve learned.

  1. Don’t try to memorize every line—it is a hopeless cause. Have notes in your hand or use a PowerPoint presentation which highlights the key points that you want to make.
  2. Know your material and rehearse it several times beforehand. Record yourself giving the talk and note what you did right and wrong. Have your friends critique you.
  3. Make it personal. Talk about yourself, what you think about the things you are speaking about, and most importantly—what this means for the audience. This means that you have to know your audience—who they are and what they are interested in. Remember: this is for them—not for you. Don’t do what most academics do—impersonalize the material and repeatedly give the same dry, dull, and boring lecture.
  4. Tell a story…..

Read more here:

http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20130614025137-8451-how-to-go-from-being-a-disaster-to-a-great-speaker?trk=tod-home-art-large_0

When Should Lawyers Use Big Words?

It’s a deceptively simple question, and I imagined the answer was either “yes” or “no”, perhaps with caveats depending on the type of case or the make-up of the jury or some other variable I would soon discover. In fact, the answer is far more complex and, I think, more interesting.

First though, it’s important to explain what I mean by “big words.” Legal discourse is so different from standard English (or any other language) that it has its own name: legalese. Legalese is an arcane portmanteau that borrows words from Latin and the far reaches of several other contemporary (and even borderline extinct) languages.

by Adam Alter, Ph.D. from New York University Stern School of Business

More about sounding smart with sounding stodgy here:

http://www.thejuryexpert.com/2013/03/when-should-lawyers-use-big-words/

Does the Pitch of Your Voice Impact Audience Perception?

By: Kacy Miller

Imagine you’re sitting in a jury box, and the trial attorney sounds just like Morgan Freeman. Or James Earl Jones.  Or Matthew McConaughey.  Or even Kathleen Turner or Judi Dench.

Then imagine that we can clone that attorney and make a “twin” who is 100% identical in look, style, demeanor, presentation, diction– everything but for the pitch of voice. One is a baritone and the other, a tenor.

Who do you think the audience would deem more trustworthy?  More competent?  As the better leader?

Read more here:

http://courtroomlogic.com/2013/03/15/pitch-and-perception/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pitch-and-perception

Five Tips for Becoming A More Persuasive Speaker.

By: Kacy Miller

In a perfect world, we’d all have innate communication skills that would magically transform any audience into a group of attentive, interested and engaged listeners. Unfortunately–as we know all too well– we don’t live in a perfect world and all too often, audiences flip the ignore switch.

Whether you’re a natural speaking in front of an audience, or a works-in-progress, each and every one of us has one persuasive tool available 24/7: our voice. And the bonus? It’s free!

When it comes to using our voice as a persuasive tool, variety is the key. Acting coaches and communications experts teach a number of strategies for integrating vocal variety into communications. Here are a few suggestions:

Read more here:

http://courtroomlogic.com/2013/03/24/becoming-a-more-persuasive-speaker/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=becoming-a-more-persuasive-speaker

5 Signs of a Dysfunctional Trial Team (and What to Do About It)

by Ken Lopez
Founder & CEO
A2L Consulting

Anxiety does strange things to people, especially when they are working together in teams. When they become anxious, a rare few people become more focused and Zen-like. For most people and teams, however high anxiety causes one (or more) of five predictable dysfunctional behaviors to be manifested, of course subconsciously. The anxious person is usually not aware that he or she is behaving in this way.

 

Full article here:

http://www.a2lc.com/blog/bid/63590/5-Signs-of-a-Dysfunctional-Trial-Team-and-What-to-Do-About-It?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+a2lc+%28The+Litigation+Consulting+Report+from+A2L+Consulting%29

Want to Become a More Powerful and Confident Communicator? Fake it til You Become it

In an amazing presentation, Havard professor Amy Cuddy, gives inspirational advice in dealing with fears and communicating in an effective way through a simple, quick process.

Body language affects how others see us, but can it also change how we see ourselves?  Social psychologist Amy Cuddy shares an easy way that anyone can change not only others’ perceptions of them, but the way they feel about themselves .

In her 20 minute TED talks, Cuddy points out that, “Tiny tweaks can lead to big changes.”

 

 

Communicating with Your Expert

Communicating is one of the most influential things we do on a daily basis. Whether we are communicating to our assistants, our colleagues, a judge, jury or with an expert, what we say and how we say it can have a profound effect on the outcome.

This ABA section delivers some easy, yet crucial tips, when communicating with our experts.

 

-David W Mykel

The Art of Trial Sciences