TED Talks – Elizabeth Loftus: The Fiction of Memory

Memory is a remarkable and fragile phenomenon. Or so says Elizabeth Loftus, a researcher and psychologist whose TED talk is the basis for this blog post.

Memory is an important component of our lives as actors and performers and certainly an important part of the lives of lawyers and their witnesses. Attorneys rely on their clients and their witnesses for memories of events, contracts, their actions and the actions of all the folks who are a part of the trial story. For many years, the research has shown that eyewitness testimony can be remarkably UNRELIABLE. Elizabeth Loftus in this enlightening talk expands on this through her own research.

Read more here:

http://legalstage.com/2013/10/03/ted-talks-elizabeth-loftus-the-fiction-of-memory/

Communicate More Effectively: Tune Your Witness’s Tone of Voice

Tune Your Witness’s Tone of Voice

By Dr. Shelley Spiecker:

Speaking Bubbles

A few days ago I was helping prepare a successful CEO for testimony in an upcoming arbitration. The case boiled down to a dispute between two shareholders with one advocating for dissolution of their agreement and the other seeking to keep the agreement in force. My client’s testimony and credibility would be crucial to the case. A high self-monitor, he quickly picked up on my recommendations for posture, eye contact, and other key nonverbal credibility cues. One impediment remained – a tendency to end sentences with an upward vocal inflection. While infrequent, this “uptalking” had the overall effect of making him appear uncertain and less believable than desired.

Ironically, while vocal characteristics speak volumes in terms of impression formation, they can often be one of the more difficult aspects of witness presentation to change. Sager suggests that scientifically voice sounds different to the speaker than it does to the listener, a key reason it can be difficult for many witnesses to self-correct their vocal cues.

Recent research suggests that making the effort to assess vocal quality and enhance vocal effectiveness can pay off.

Read more here:

http://www.persuasivelitigator.com/2013/05/what-are-your-witnesses-saying-when-they-speak.html

Does the Pitch of Your Voice Impact Audience Perception?

By: Kacy Miller

Imagine you’re sitting in a jury box, and the trial attorney sounds just like Morgan Freeman. Or James Earl Jones.  Or Matthew McConaughey.  Or even Kathleen Turner or Judi Dench.

Then imagine that we can clone that attorney and make a “twin” who is 100% identical in look, style, demeanor, presentation, diction– everything but for the pitch of voice. One is a baritone and the other, a tenor.

Who do you think the audience would deem more trustworthy?  More competent?  As the better leader?

Read more here:

http://courtroomlogic.com/2013/03/15/pitch-and-perception/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pitch-and-perception

Five Tips for Becoming A More Persuasive Speaker.

By: Kacy Miller

In a perfect world, we’d all have innate communication skills that would magically transform any audience into a group of attentive, interested and engaged listeners. Unfortunately–as we know all too well– we don’t live in a perfect world and all too often, audiences flip the ignore switch.

Whether you’re a natural speaking in front of an audience, or a works-in-progress, each and every one of us has one persuasive tool available 24/7: our voice. And the bonus? It’s free!

When it comes to using our voice as a persuasive tool, variety is the key. Acting coaches and communications experts teach a number of strategies for integrating vocal variety into communications. Here are a few suggestions:

Read more here:

http://courtroomlogic.com/2013/03/24/becoming-a-more-persuasive-speaker/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=becoming-a-more-persuasive-speaker

5 Signs of a Dysfunctional Trial Team (and What to Do About It)

by Ken Lopez
Founder & CEO
A2L Consulting

Anxiety does strange things to people, especially when they are working together in teams. When they become anxious, a rare few people become more focused and Zen-like. For most people and teams, however high anxiety causes one (or more) of five predictable dysfunctional behaviors to be manifested, of course subconsciously. The anxious person is usually not aware that he or she is behaving in this way.

 

Full article here:

http://www.a2lc.com/blog/bid/63590/5-Signs-of-a-Dysfunctional-Trial-Team-and-What-to-Do-About-It?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+a2lc+%28The+Litigation+Consulting+Report+from+A2L+Consulting%29

Want to Become a Better Communicator? Become a Better Leader

 

The lack of leadership abilities, an inability to engender respect and overall poor performance was killing his profits. Unfortunately, while his way of describing his leaders was a novel one (i.e., morbid curiosity), the existence of poor leadership is anything but a novelty.

The most commonly occurring of these competencies are:

  • Envision an Outcome – The ability to clearly envision a strategic outcome, think conceptually and see the big-picture.
  • Understand Others – Often called “Emotional Intelligence” this is the ability to accurately understand those being lead.
  • Inspire Others – Brining understanding of the strategic vision and emotional intelligence together to effectively communicate that vision and achieve buy in.
  • Understand Themselves – One of the most overlooked traits, this is the ability to objectively understand one’s own strengths and weaknesses.

Complete Your Leadership Talents Profile Here

By guest author Jay Niblick, Founder/CEO – Innermetrix Inc.

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Want to Become a More Powerful and Confident Communicator? Fake it til You Become it

In an amazing presentation, Havard professor Amy Cuddy, gives inspirational advice in dealing with fears and communicating in an effective way through a simple, quick process.

Body language affects how others see us, but can it also change how we see ourselves?  Social psychologist Amy Cuddy shares an easy way that anyone can change not only others’ perceptions of them, but the way they feel about themselves .

In her 20 minute TED talks, Cuddy points out that, “Tiny tweaks can lead to big changes.”