Does the Pitch of Your Voice Impact Audience Perception?

By: Kacy Miller

Imagine you’re sitting in a jury box, and the trial attorney sounds just like Morgan Freeman. Or James Earl Jones.  Or Matthew McConaughey.  Or even Kathleen Turner or Judi Dench.

Then imagine that we can clone that attorney and make a “twin” who is 100% identical in look, style, demeanor, presentation, diction– everything but for the pitch of voice. One is a baritone and the other, a tenor.

Who do you think the audience would deem more trustworthy?  More competent?  As the better leader?

Read more here:

http://courtroomlogic.com/2013/03/15/pitch-and-perception/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pitch-and-perception

Five Tips for Becoming A More Persuasive Speaker.

By: Kacy Miller

In a perfect world, we’d all have innate communication skills that would magically transform any audience into a group of attentive, interested and engaged listeners. Unfortunately–as we know all too well– we don’t live in a perfect world and all too often, audiences flip the ignore switch.

Whether you’re a natural speaking in front of an audience, or a works-in-progress, each and every one of us has one persuasive tool available 24/7: our voice. And the bonus? It’s free!

When it comes to using our voice as a persuasive tool, variety is the key. Acting coaches and communications experts teach a number of strategies for integrating vocal variety into communications. Here are a few suggestions:

Read more here:

http://courtroomlogic.com/2013/03/24/becoming-a-more-persuasive-speaker/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=becoming-a-more-persuasive-speaker

Want to Become a More Powerful and Confident Communicator? Fake it til You Become it

In an amazing presentation, Havard professor Amy Cuddy, gives inspirational advice in dealing with fears and communicating in an effective way through a simple, quick process.

Body language affects how others see us, but can it also change how we see ourselves?  Social psychologist Amy Cuddy shares an easy way that anyone can change not only others’ perceptions of them, but the way they feel about themselves .

In her 20 minute TED talks, Cuddy points out that, “Tiny tweaks can lead to big changes.”

 

 

The Simple Influences of Social Psychology on Complex Things

How is it that people can be convinced to say “yes” to something even if they may not be interested in the idea on its merits? In other words, why are we such suckers? Why do we end up saying “yes” to salespeople selling us products we don’t want all the time?

In the video below, Cialdini explains why we are so susceptible.

http://bigthink.com/robertcialdini (click the social psychology link)

The Neuropsychology of Persuasion: 6 Shortcuts to Winning Someone Over

Persuasion

In our increasingly overloaded lives today we need shortcuts, or rules of thumb, to guide our decision-making. So says Big Think expert Robert Cialdini, professor of marketing and psychology at Arizona State University

Cialdini’s research is based on six fundamental principles of human influence: reciprocity, scarcity, authority, consistency, liking and consensus. Cialdini says that if these principles are employed in an ethical manner, they can significantly increase the chances that someone will be persuaded by your request.

These shortcuts are explained in the video animation here:

Looking to Engage an Audience? Tell a Story…using Levers

Daniel Goleman shares some insight on storytelling using different levers depending on your audience.  For those of in the communications and litigation worlds, the use of the redescription lever is the most notable and something that we should implement everyday, whether we are talking with our clients, jurors, judges or bosses.  While implementing this lever, be wary of what Goleman calls resistances, as I have clients spend countless hours developing presentations, only to fall flat on delivery, because they didn’t wholly consider their audience’s needs.

Enjoy!

Levers of storytelling

One of the ways in which innovative stories seem crucial is when a business is changing direction. Or when you need to mobilize people when things go wrong. Or when you need to reinvigorate a team due to low morale. Which begs the question: What are the kinds of levers that a leader can use to create an effective storytelling strategy to move people in the right direction?

First, it depends on who you are dealing with…

More here:

http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20121206172801-117825785-strategic-storytelling?trk=eml-mktg-condig-118-p1
By:

Daniel Goleman

Co-Director of Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence in Organizations

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Mimicking Can Make You a Better Communicator

We like people more when they mimic us. But only up to a point. If mimicry becomes too obvious, it can backfire, becoming mockery. A new study asks just how much imitation is enough to trigger benefits. Does the mimicker need to copy every action, or merely to move the same body parts?

Peggy Sparenberg and her colleagues conducted three experiments in all. In the first two, 126 participants performed movements while at the same time watching videos of human-like avatars performing various movements of their own here:

http://bps-research-digest.blogspot.com/2012/12/for-mimicry-to-flatter-its-all-about.html

 

dog-mimicking-sign-shopped-or-not

The Secret to Communicating More Effectively….

“In the right key one can say anything.  In the wrong key, nothing: the only delicate part is the establishment of the key.”

—George Bernard Shaw

By Tony Robbins

One of the best ways to become aware of the astonishing diversity of human reactions is to speak to a group of people. You can’t help noticing how differently people react to the same thing. You tell a motivational story, and one person will be transfixed, another bored to tears. You tell a joke, and one person howls while another doesn’t move a muscle.  You’d think each person was listening in a different mental language.

The question is, why do people react so differently to identical messages? Why does one person see the glass as half-empty and another see it as half-full?  Why does one person hear a message and feel energized, excited and motivated while another heads the exact same message and doesn’t respond at all?

More here: http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20121204003551-101706366-the-secret-to-communicating-more-effectively-metaprogram-1

When Communicating, Watch Your Body Language, It Tells More Than You Think

If you think that you can judge by examining someone’s facial expressions if he has just hit the jackpot in the lottery or lost everything in the stock market — think again. Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at New York University and Princeton University have discovered that, it just doesn’t work that way.

Rather, they found that body language provides a better cue in trying to judge whether an observed subject has undergone strong positive or negative experiences.

In a study published this week in the journal Science, the researchers present data showing…

http://www.huji.ac.il/cgi-bin/dovrut/dovrut_search_eng.pl?mesge135584551205872560

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This is extremely interesting data, since it flies directly in the face of everything we have been previously taught.  Nevertheless, if you want to be an effective and persuasive communicator, you need to pay attention to all facets of your presentation; and this means your body as well.

So, remember, when giving presentations, be sure you know the message you’re conveying non-verbally as well.  A great way to address this is practice in front of a mirror, a friend or videotape.  I find video taping to be the best medium and achieve the most accurate results, because as they say in show business, the tape never lies….

-David W. Mykel

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How to Communicate More Effectively

Five Powerful Communication Tips

When it comes to communication, most of us tend to think that if we’ve been misunderstood, it is the receiver of the information that is at fault for not understanding. But in reality, the responsibility is on the communicator – that’s you – to acknowledge that if something isn’t understood properly by someone else, it is up to you to change and improve your communication. This is due to the fact that every one of us, no matter how similar our experiences may be, has a unique perspective of life, a unique model of the world from which we receive and process information. We filter out, delete, and distort incoming information on a regular basis out of necessity.

People typically receive 2 million bits of information every second, but are only consciously aware of 126 bits of information at a time…

Here are 5 tips for improving your communication:

http://inspiyr.com/communicate-more-effectively/

by | on November 4th, 2012 |